exit/in Archive

  • Woohoo! The weekend is here and it is HOT…I mean literally. Hell, we are even under a heat advisory. Add that to the lovely humidity and it is stifling. What better way...

    Nashville Weekend “It” List: Surface of the Sun Prince Edition

    Woohoo! The weekend is here and it is HOT…I mean literally. Hell, we are even under a heat advisory. Add that to the lovely humidity and it is stifling. What better way...

    Continue Reading...

  • Aren’t we just smack dab in the middle of the holiday season…a couple days of Hanukah left and the last weekend before Christmas makes for a very festive weekend… The...

    Nashville Weekend “It” List: It’s a Wonderful Weekend Edition

    Aren’t we just smack dab in the middle of the holiday season…a couple days of Hanukah left and the last weekend before Christmas makes for a very festive weekend… The...

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  • <p>After my last <strong>Ween </strong>experience, I walked into the Exit/In Tuesday with great trepidation.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Could Gene Ween (Aaron Freeman) playing solo exorcise the demons from that awful show in Columbus five years ago, or would I regret not tackling my laundry instead?</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Starting with the country twang of Roger Miller's <em>Kansas City Star</em>, Gene Ween made ample amends for the other show.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>With the band on hiatus, Gene Ween assembled band and took a set of seldom-heard Ween tracks on the road. While no one would call it Ween without Gene's partner in crime, Dean Ween, this band performed a different task by weaving B-sides, side project tracks and choices covers into a cohesive whole.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Gene Ween looked overweight but happy and sober, as opposed to the skinny, strung-out image he cut for much of the band's history.  He jawed a little with the audience of Ween diehards while wolfing down cigarettes between and during some songs.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Backed by Ween regulars Bassist Dave Dreiwitz, guitarist Scott Metzger and drummer Joe Russo, Gene Ween put on numerous genre exercises, moving from Miller's country onto light psychedelia, Beatles-style pop-rock and electric blues.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>The trademark Ween weirdness got its due, although Gene Ween played it straight for much of the set. Any time he seemed too straightforward, he knew to return to an oddball anthem. He could even subvert a classic - delivering the most warped version of <em>Mr. Sandman</em> ever.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Marshalling through a parade of rarities from Ween and its side projects, Gene Ween dragged out a rejected theme for the Seth Green sitcom <em>Greg the Bunny</em> (Unfortunately, Ween's rejected Pizza Hut theme didn't make the cut). With <em>Let's Get Divorced</em>, he spat nasty lyrics over a gurgling, off-kilter tuba that Tom Waits would have approved of.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>On the surprisingly poignant<em> So Long, Jerry</em>, Ween eulogizes Grateful Dead frontman Jerry Garcia above a Dead-esque country rock beat. This leftover from <em>12 Golden Country Greats</em> could have easily fit on that record.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>The band calmed the European techno beat of <em>Friends </em>into a somewhat heavy rocker, with the intentionally idiotic lyrics fitting perfectly with the new arrangement.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>The Gene Ween Band might just be an excuse to run through some old favorites and choice covers, but on this night, they proved Ween has plenty of gems that deserve a live spotlight.</p>
<p> </p>
<p> Plus, I can finally forgive them for stinking it up in Columbus all those years ago.</p>

    Gene Ween Band Trots Out Stellar Rarities

    After my last Ween experience, I walked into the Exit/In Tuesday with great trepidation.

     

    Could Gene Ween (Aaron Freeman) playing solo exorcise the demons from that awful show in Columbus five years ago, or would I regret not tackling my laundry instead?

     

    Starting with the country twang of Roger Miller's Kansas City Star, Gene Ween made ample amends for the other show.

     

    With the band on hiatus, Gene Ween assembled band and took a set of seldom-heard Ween tracks on the road. While no one would call it Ween without Gene's partner in crime, Dean Ween, this band performed a different task by weaving B-sides, side project tracks and choices covers into a cohesive whole.

     

    Gene Ween looked overweight but happy and sober, as opposed to the skinny, strung-out image he cut for much of the band's history. He jawed a little with the audience of Ween diehards while wolfing down cigarettes between and during some songs.

     

    Backed by Ween regulars Bassist Dave Dreiwitz, guitarist Scott Metzger and drummer Joe Russo, Gene Ween put on numerous genre exercises, moving from Miller's country onto light psychedelia, Beatles-style pop-rock and electric blues.

     

    The trademark Ween weirdness got its due, although Gene Ween played it straight for much of the set. Any time he seemed too straightforward, he knew to return to an oddball anthem. He could even subvert a classic - delivering the most warped version of Mr. Sandman ever.

     

    Marshalling through a parade of rarities from Ween and its side projects, Gene Ween dragged out a rejected theme for the Seth Green sitcom Greg the Bunny (Unfortunately, Ween's rejected Pizza Hut theme didn't make the cut). With Let's Get Divorced, he spat nasty lyrics over a gurgling, off-kilter tuba that Tom Waits would have approved of.

     

    On the surprisingly poignant So Long, Jerry, Ween eulogizes Grateful Dead frontman Jerry Garcia above a Dead-esque country rock beat. This leftover from 12 Golden Country Greats could have easily fit on that record.

     

    The band calmed the European techno beat of Friends into a somewhat heavy rocker, with the intentionally idiotic lyrics fitting perfectly with the new arrangement.

     

    The Gene Ween Band might just be an excuse to run through some old favorites and choice covers, but on this night, they proved Ween has plenty of gems that deserve a live spotlight.

     

     Plus, I can finally forgive them for stinking it up in Columbus all those years ago.

    Continue Reading...