Tapping into the Brain Power of Your Social Network: Wisdom of Crowds

Social networking isn’t just for marketing your music, it can be much more. It’s a way to tap into the brain power of your network to help make better decisions that you possibly could. What? Am I saying that your fans could help you make career decisions and would be better than you who know much more of what’s going on with your career? Yes I am saying that; under certain circumstances.

Social networking isn’t just for marketing your music, it can be much more. It’s a way to tap into the brain power of your network to help make better decisions that you possibly could. What? Am I saying that your fans could help you make career decisions and would be better than you who know much more of what’s going on with your career? Yes I am saying that; under certain circumstances.

This is the theory of “Wisdom of Crowds” by James Surowiecki. Where as under certain circumstances a group of people (could be your fans) is smarter than someone that would be considered an expert. From Amazon.com book description:

If four basic conditions are met, a crowd’s “collective intelligence” will produce better outcomes than a small group of experts, Surowiecki says, even if members of the crowd don’t know all the facts or choose, individually, to act irrationally. “Wise crowds” need (1) diversity of opinion; (2) independence of members from one another; (3) decentralization; and (4) a good method for aggregating opinions.

This theory is being used in Nashville by major artists such as Rascal Flatts. They polled their fan base to pick one of their singles to be released to radio. “My Wish” was chosen, it wasn’t the one that the pluggers picked either (from my recollection in the conversation) and it went to number 1 on the US country music charts. The cool thing is not only did they use the collective wisdom of their fans but the fans also had a vestige interest in the song doing well. They had a connection to that they would have not had if the song was picked by the label executives or pluggers or who ever had the say.

The nice thing about wisdom of crowds is that you could have a few hundred fans or millions and it still works. So the argument that you don’t have enough fans is moot.

Why stop at just a single? You could put 20 song demo’s on your website, set up a poll and let your fans pick you’re the songs for your album. The collective wisdom if done right could put together your best album yet.

Pick up the book, read it and apply, it’s that easy. There is so much potential when you think of it.

More books I have read about crowdsourcing and can recommend are on my amazon.com Astore.

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About mdave

David has been using computers to create his visions since the early days of the Apple II. When the world wide web hit he dove in head first learning HTML and building his first websites. After spending a few years at a software services firm in Milwaukee he moved to Nashville and shortly after the Music Industry grabbed hold. He joined the Country Music Association as webmaster designing, building and managing the CMA Awards, CMA Music Festival and corporate websites for the 8 years. He started their social media reach-out and when he left the CMA could reach over 50,000 fans directly. David currently freelances by day, codes by night along with producing/hosting the Nashville Tech Feed a technology podcast. David was named by Billboard Magazine as one of the top 140 people in the Music Industry to follow on Twitter. , Facebook and Twitter