Lessons Learned, The Music Industry Hasn’t Changed. Beware the “Record Deal”

The Nashville Scene has a great article the Music Business workings in Nashville. It used to be a Nashville artist (non-country) couldn’t get a record deal but now they get deals and still screws the artists in the long run. It’s a long article but shows how some of our most talented artistsgo through the grinder and end up as little pieces of meat at the other end.

The Nashville Scene has a great article the Music Business workings in Nashville. It used to be a Nashville artist (non-country) couldn’t get a record deal but now they get deals and still screws the artists in the long run. It’s a long article but shows how some of our most talented artists (DeNovo Dahl one of our local favorites. Podcast #2) go through the grinder and end up as little pieces of meat at the other end. Best quote of the whole piece is the last paragraph:

" 'Look, this has nothing to do with your band,' " Gold remembers his lawyer telling him after the deal was dead. " 'These are just oceans moving in a huge multinational corporation. You are just a pimple on the back of an elephant.' "

The lesson learned that getting a deal isn’t the “we made it” moment but the beginning of a long painful process. Remember you’re just a pimple on an elephant. I still think that an artist can make it on your own, you won’t be a multimillion but you can make a living doing what you love. Just like any other job climbing the ladder won’t be easy but with persistence and time you can do it…. slowly and organically. I highly suggest you read this article. Further Reading:

About mdave

David has been using computers to create his visions since the early days of the Apple II. When the world wide web hit he dove in head first learning HTML and building his first websites. After spending a few years at a software services firm in Milwaukee he moved to Nashville and shortly after the Music Industry grabbed hold. He joined the Country Music Association as webmaster designing, building and managing the CMA Awards, CMA Music Festival and corporate websites for the 8 years. He started their social media reach-out and when he left the CMA could reach over 50,000 fans directly. David currently freelances by day, codes by night along with producing/hosting the Nashville Tech Feed a technology podcast. David was named by Billboard Magazine as one of the top 140 people in the Music Industry to follow on Twitter. , Facebook and Twitter