Has the Download Ruined the Music Connection?

Has the download ruined the connection between us and the music? You've heard the argument that the CD had nothing on the vinyl album for sound. I suggest they had in common the connection the experience of acquiring the music itself.

Has the download ruined the connection between us and the music? You’ve heard the argument that the CD had nothing on the vinyl album for sound. I suggest they had in common the connection the experience of acquiring the music itself. That experience where you got in your car, or walked or got a ride to the local music store where you dug through piles of vinyl or CDs to find the one you wanted. Then deciding whether you could afford it or if it was worth buying. Now the CD is my experience so forgive me all the vinyl people out there for the angle this is written. So then after purchasing it opening up the plastic and popping it in to listen on the way home. Pretty much it would be in the player until you got sick of it.

I can remember my first CD bought along with many more, I bet you can too. The experience of time of year and why you bought it. Maybe a concert or it had on it a hot song of that summer.

So things changed with the advent of the MP3 player and the simplicity of the iPod and iTunes from Apple. But event though the experience is easy its not memorable. Do you have the same memory when you bought that latest album, maybe you remember the wait while it downloaded.

Again its that connection with the process. I don’t even have the same feelings towards new music that I bought digitally. Even with Amazon.com you get a package in the mail where opening it feels a little like your birthday or Christmas.

Is this something else the music industry will have to confront in the future? Do they care? Is it even something they really need to worry about. Working in the music industry I wonder myself. I do know I don’t feel the same connection, maybe that’s why vinyl people felt about the CD when it came out.

 

About mdave

David has been using computers to create his visions since the early days of the Apple II. When the world wide web hit he dove in head first learning HTML and building his first websites. After spending a few years at a software services firm in Milwaukee he moved to Nashville and shortly after the Music Industry grabbed hold. He joined the Country Music Association as webmaster designing, building and managing the CMA Awards, CMA Music Festival and corporate websites for the 8 years. He started their social media reach-out and when he left the CMA could reach over 50,000 fans directly. David currently freelances by day, codes by night along with producing/hosting the Nashville Tech Feed a technology podcast. David was named by Billboard Magazine as one of the top 140 people in the Music Industry to follow on Twitter. , Facebook and Twitter