5 Reasons a DYI Artist Should Attend Podcamp

So the Nashville Feed has been on hiatus for the past year while other projects take priorities and I figure that no other way to kick off blogging again but...

So the Nashville Feed has been on hiatus for the past year while other projects take priorities and I figure that no other way to kick off blogging again but a post about Nashvilles very own Podcamp. It is an event for that anybody that creates something should attend.

From Podcamp.org: PodCamp isn’t just about podcasting! If you’re interested in blogging, social media, social networking, podcasting, video on the net, if you’re a podsafe musician (or want to be), or just someone curious about new media, then please join us — and bring a friend or colleague.

So why should you attend Podcamp Nashville? It’s an event that DYI music artists can get lots of useful information on how to take the tools of the Internet and leverage them to your advantage.

Here are my top 5 reasons a independent music artist should attend Podcamp Nashville 2012:

  1. Sessions Help Your MarketingWhere Music & Tech Meet, Stop Social Media Pollution, New Concept in Social Media marketing…. Be genuine and so many more.
  2. Networking Outside the Music Industry – There are a lot of tech geeks who will talk to you offering lots of free great info.
  3. It’s Free! – That’s right all you have to do is show up. It is recommended to purchase lunch there which helps pay for the venue.
  4. Knowledge is Power – The knowledge you gain at Podcamp can help you save time and money.
  5. It’s in a Bar! (non-smoking) – As an artist this is probably a location you would be familiar and comfortable place to hang out.


My advice is if you’re not sold yet take a look at the other articles in the Podcamp Nashville blog tour. It’s a good opportunity to play more and work less.

About mdave

David has been using computers to create his visions since the early days of the Apple II. When the world wide web hit he dove in head first learning HTML and building his first websites. After spending a few years at a software services firm in Milwaukee he moved to Nashville and shortly after the Music Industry grabbed hold. He joined the Country Music Association as webmaster designing, building and managing the CMA Awards, CMA Music Festival and corporate websites for the 8 years. He started their social media reach-out and when he left the CMA could reach over 50,000 fans directly. David currently freelances by day, codes by night along with producing/hosting the Nashville Tech Feed a technology podcast. David was named by Billboard Magazine as one of the top 140 people in the Music Industry to follow on Twitter. , Facebook and Twitter