Technology Archive

  • <div class=MySpace

    At the Expense of Friendster

    MySpace claims over a 110 million active users and growing. It still is the premier online community for music BUT has it’s time passed? Every month a new social network comes online that caters to a more niche demographic and more improved with web 2.0 (wikipedia) goodies. Just as MySpace learned from Friendster these new networks have learned from MySpace. Originally I was on Friendster, and then moved over to MySpace when I discovered the site short there after most of my friends were on board. It was so flexible so with a little html you could really “trick out” your page. There was music and lots of it which helped with my podcast. MySpace wasn’t perfect, it had bugs and it went down fairly often. I could deal with it at that time.

    MySpace Today?

    Fast forward to now. The site has grown to 200 million profiles from the 19 million when I joined. I have a list over 400 friends which I kept tight mostly with friends I know in-person. The company was bought by News Corp which is focused on leveraging the user base for revenue. The New York Times reported they make $40 million a month currently and want to expand it to $70 a month in 2008. Almost every new feature introduced is to stave off a competitor (video, politics, movie trailers, films) while removing some of the flexibility I loved. (CSS Styles and some HTML on bulletins). The site is over run with porn and spammers. I personally get a dozen or more porn “friend requests” a day. The annoyances have got overwhelming.

    The New Social Darlin’

    FaceBook

    The new social darling is FaceBook. Not really new but just this year you could open an account with out a EDU domain email. It doesn’t have the flexibility of MySpace but it doesn’t have the spam or porn either. (As of yet that is) They have hundreds of little applications that you can add or subtract from your profile. The best feature is the news thread, when you interact with the site it adds it to the thread. So all your friends see what you’re doing. You can you control how much is show so if you want to let everybody know what your up to or nothing at all. Everyday I see a list of things my friends are doing, with MySpace you could add a friend and never see them again. The site isn’t as easy to use as MySpace but just like anything new it gets easier. FaceBook is my new hangout. If you're on FaceBook go ahead and join our FaceBook group.

    Is MySpace Over?

    Getting down to what does that mean for music artists? Do you abandon your MySpace page? The quick answer is “No.” The longer answer is sort of but you will have to diversify. Where you only had a MySpace page I would say you would have to expand to other social networks; FaceBook is a good place to expand. Like in the past I it does not replace your main website. Everything leads to your main website. One of my previous posts explains this more Are You Promoting MySpace or Your Brand?

    Next post FaceBook Basics for Artists - Getting Started

    Further Reading:

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    " title="Is MySpace Over? Done? Stick a Fork In It?" />

Is MySpace Over? Done? Stick a Fork In It?

MySpace

At the Expense of Friendster

MySpace claims over a 110 million active users and growing. It still is the premier online community for music BUT has it’s time passed? Every month a new social network comes online that caters to a more niche demographic and more improved with web 2.0 (wikipedia) goodies. Just as MySpace learned from Friendster these new networks have learned from MySpace. Originally I was on Friendster, and then moved over to MySpace when I discovered the site short there after most of my friends were on board. It was so flexible so with a little html you could really “trick out” your page. There was music and lots of it which helped with my podcast. MySpace wasn’t perfect, it had bugs and it went down fairly often. I could deal with it at that time.

MySpace Today?

Fast forward to now. The site has grown to 200 million profiles from the 19 million when I joined. I have a list over 400 friends which I kept tight mostly with friends I know in-person. The company was bought by News Corp which is focused on leveraging the user base for revenue. The New York Times reported they make $40 million a month currently and want to expand it to $70 a month in 2008. Almost every new feature introduced is to stave off a competitor (video, politics, movie trailers, films) while removing some of the flexibility I loved. (CSS Styles and some HTML on bulletins). The site is over run with porn and spammers. I personally get a dozen or more porn “friend requests” a day. The annoyances have got overwhelming.

The New Social Darlin’

FaceBook

The new social darling is FaceBook. Not really new but just this year you could open an account with out a EDU domain email. It doesn’t have the flexibility of MySpace but it doesn’t have the spam or porn either. (As of yet that is) They have hundreds of little applications that you can add or subtract from your profile. The best feature is the news thread, when you interact with the site it adds it to the thread. So all your friends see what you’re doing. You can you control how much is show so if you want to let everybody know what your up to or nothing at all. Everyday I see a list of things my friends are doing, with MySpace you could add a friend and never see them again. The site isn’t as easy to use as MySpace but just like anything new it gets easier. FaceBook is my new hangout. If you're on FaceBook go ahead and join our FaceBook group.

Is MySpace Over?

Getting down to what does that mean for music artists? Do you abandon your MySpace page? The quick answer is “No.” The longer answer is sort of but you will have to diversify. Where you only had a MySpace page I would say you would have to expand to other social networks; FaceBook is a good place to expand. Like in the past I it does not replace your main website. Everything leads to your main website. One of my previous posts explains this more Are You Promoting MySpace or Your Brand?

Next post FaceBook Basics for Artists - Getting Started

Further Reading:

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  • <div align=McDonalds in Green Hills

    Distribution of media is getting easier as technology becomes less expensive. A few years ago you needed a million dollars to get an album out on sale somewhere. Today an internet connection can do the same and reach more.

    Purchasing your media is the same, more choice and variety. No longer do you have to go to Best Buy to get the newest Smashing Pumpkins album. You have the big box retailers, online big retailers along with the small shops like CD Baby and then there is iTunes, Emusic, Yahoo!, etc. Then there are the new places you wouldn’t expect like Starbucks which now is also a music label (Starbucks Entertainment aka Hear Music) and Cracker Barrel.

    Where does it go next? It goes to even more non-traditional like food and non-music retailers. As these companies markets mature their expansion slows which affects stock prices and they go looking for niches to continue growth. Music and video are inexpensive and effective ways to do this.

    Driving down 12th Avenue is a billboard for McDonalds Redbox DVD rentals. You can go to almost any McDonalds in Nashville and rent a DVD via a machine like a bank auto teller machine. For $1.00 a night you can get the top 70 new releases. The best part is you can return it too any other McDonalds that has a Redbox kiosk.

    Doesn’t sound like a bad idea overall, McDonalds gets repeat traffic and probably a cut of each machines rentals or flat fee. Redbox gets an instant audience and can compete with Blockbuster not in amount of DVDs for rent but for customer convenience.

    So when do you think McDonalds or Burger King are going to greet you with “Would you like the new Protomen album with your combo meal?”

    Further Reading:

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    " title="Would You Like Fries with Your DVD rental?" />
  • Would You Like Fries with Your DVD rental?

    McDonalds in Green Hills

    Distribution of media is getting easier as technology becomes less expensive. A few years ago you needed a million dollars to get an album out on sale somewhere. Today an internet connection can do the same and reach more.

    Purchasing your media is the same, more choice and variety. No longer do you have to go to Best Buy to get the newest Smashing Pumpkins album. You have the big box retailers, online big retailers along with the small shops like CD Baby and then there is iTunes, Emusic, Yahoo!, etc. Then there are the new places you wouldn’t expect like Starbucks which now is also a music label (Starbucks Entertainment aka Hear Music) and Cracker Barrel.

    Where does it go next? It goes to even more non-traditional like food and non-music retailers. As these companies markets mature their expansion slows which affects stock prices and they go looking for niches to continue growth. Music and video are inexpensive and effective ways to do this.

    Driving down 12th Avenue is a billboard for McDonalds Redbox DVD rentals. You can go to almost any McDonalds in Nashville and rent a DVD via a machine like a bank auto teller machine. For $1.00 a night you can get the top 70 new releases. The best part is you can return it too any other McDonalds that has a Redbox kiosk.

    Doesn’t sound like a bad idea overall, McDonalds gets repeat traffic and probably a cut of each machines rentals or flat fee. Redbox gets an instant audience and can compete with Blockbuster not in amount of DVDs for rent but for customer convenience.

    So when do you think McDonalds or Burger King are going to greet you with “Would you like the new Protomen album with your combo meal?”

    Further Reading:

    Technorati Tags: , ,

    Continue Reading...

  • <div style=

    It seems like everyday you see articles speaking of the demise of the music industry as a whole. The big one was a few years ago when a Wired magazine arrived at my desk with the cover picture of the burning Hindenburg and the once Apple tagline “Rip. Mix. Burn.” It included a CD of music that was licensed with Creative Commons which you could basically rip, mix and burn without worry of getting in legal trouble. I like to think that that was the issue that brought the issues out in the open for the industry. It was copied and the issue was handed around to quite a few people in the office. Nothing like that has really happened since.

    That was February 2003, now return to 2007 and what has happened since then? The illegal Napster shut down but there are people in the industry that said it was a mistake. They fought it when they should have embraced it and worked to make it a viable model. Physical album sales are still in decline while legal digital sales haven’t made up the difference. Labels are still cutting back while trying to figure out how to expand digital. Do more with less while trying to keep stockholders happy with higher returns each year.

    Rolling Stone magazine published another article last month about the continuing decline of the industry titled “The Record Industry's Decline - Record sales are tanking, and there's no hope in sight: How it all went wrong.” It kind of goes through everything the Wired article does and also continues till now. A nice aspect of the story is that it ends with how the industry is changing….slowly.

    There is no one solution to the music industries woos but people are working towards a solution. With every industry that goes through radical upheavals there will be ones that fall behind and those who excel.

    One radical idea for a possible solution is split the labels up but not in the sense of anti-trust. Each of the major labels has possibly a dozen or so imprints under the corporate umbrella so why not spin them off back into their own companies again. Consolidation was thought to be great because you could reduce labor costs and improve efficiencies but what it also does is reduce diversity. Nashville right now is having a renaissance with the independent music labels. They are thriving, innovating and nimble. So why not take a large company split it up and have a dozen nimble Indies? Its part of the “Long Tail” marketing, selling more of less.

    I think the music industry will be fine in the end of the transition. It’s the struggle from the old economy that you knew to the one you don’t.

    Further Reading:

     Technorati Tags: , , , , , ,

    " title="Rip. Mix. Burn. The Demise of the Music Industry. Again?" />
  • Rip. Mix. Burn. The Demise of the Music Industry. Again?

    It seems like everyday you see articles speaking of the demise of the music industry as a whole. The big one was a few years ago when a Wired magazine arrived at my desk with the cover picture of the burning Hindenburg and the once Apple tagline “Rip. Mix. Burn.” It included a CD of music that was licensed with Creative Commons which you could basically rip, mix and burn without worry of getting in legal trouble. I like to think that that was the issue that brought the issues out in the open for the industry. It was copied and the issue was handed around to quite a few people in the office. Nothing like that has really happened since.

    That was February 2003, now return to 2007 and what has happened since then? The illegal Napster shut down but there are people in the industry that said it was a mistake. They fought it when they should have embraced it and worked to make it a viable model. Physical album sales are still in decline while legal digital sales haven’t made up the difference. Labels are still cutting back while trying to figure out how to expand digital. Do more with less while trying to keep stockholders happy with higher returns each year.

    Rolling Stone magazine published another article last month about the continuing decline of the industry titled “The Record Industry's Decline - Record sales are tanking, and there's no hope in sight: How it all went wrong.” It kind of goes through everything the Wired article does and also continues till now. A nice aspect of the story is that it ends with how the industry is changing….slowly.

    There is no one solution to the music industries woos but people are working towards a solution. With every industry that goes through radical upheavals there will be ones that fall behind and those who excel.

    One radical idea for a possible solution is split the labels up but not in the sense of anti-trust. Each of the major labels has possibly a dozen or so imprints under the corporate umbrella so why not spin them off back into their own companies again. Consolidation was thought to be great because you could reduce labor costs and improve efficiencies but what it also does is reduce diversity. Nashville right now is having a renaissance with the independent music labels. They are thriving, innovating and nimble. So why not take a large company split it up and have a dozen nimble Indies? Its part of the “Long Tail” marketing, selling more of less.

    I think the music industry will be fine in the end of the transition. It’s the struggle from the old economy that you knew to the one you don’t.

    Further Reading:

     Technorati Tags: , , , , , ,

    Continue Reading...

  • The iPhone arrives today and I'm not the first in line at the Apple Store in Green Hills Mall (Nashville, TN). I showed up a casual 9:30 and already 50 people were in line. I'm an Apple fanboy not that die hard. I'll add photos in the gallery but its only from one angle unless I get up. Next update in about an hour. - mdave

    iPhone 1G Launch: Live Blog From Nashville TN

    The iPhone arrives today and I'm not the first in line at the Apple Store in Green Hills Mall (Nashville, TN). I showed up a casual 9:30 and already 50 people were in line. I'm an Apple fanboy not that die hard. I'll add photos in the gallery but its only from one angle unless I get up. Next update in about an hour. - mdave

    Continue Reading...

  • <div style=

    Part four builds upon past posts foundation that you want to use the most effective marketing for the time you have (ROI), that you need to be on the social network websites, mainly MySpace and that it shouldn't replace your main website. Sidebar: Every time I see a poster from a band with just the MySpace address it annoys the piss out of me. It's the easy way to do it but aren't you supposed to be building your brand not News Corp who owns MySpace. Ah but I digress, this post is going to give you some pointers on presenting your MySpace page.

    MySpace has to be the worse site to work with online, that's pretty much the consensus with anybody who actually spends time it. Code works some places and not others, all images have to be hosted somewhere else and they can change something on a moments notice screwing up some code that used to work. Basically when you open up your account everybody starts with the same page template then with graphics, html and style sheets you can make it pretty (ugly) anyway you want.

    I suggest doing the basics first on your music profile, upload your music, and add photos to your gallery, bio, tour dates and links back to your main website. Follow the KISS (keep it simple stupid) rule and once you got that then you can dink with the rest if you have the courage.

    This might sound like common sense things but often people don’t know these things. Next post I’ll explain some simple customization techniques for a good profile that doesn’t take 20 minutes to load.

    Previous Standing Out in a Crowd Posts:

    Technorati Tags: , , , ,

    " title="Standing Out in a Crowd: MySpace Common Sense?" />
  • Standing Out in a Crowd: MySpace Common Sense?

    Part four builds upon past posts foundation that you want to use the most effective marketing for the time you have (ROI), that you need to be on the social network websites, mainly MySpace and that it shouldn't replace your main website. Sidebar: Every time I see a poster from a band with just the MySpace address it annoys the piss out of me. It's the easy way to do it but aren't you supposed to be building your brand not News Corp who owns MySpace. Ah but I digress, this post is going to give you some pointers on presenting your MySpace page.

    MySpace has to be the worse site to work with online, that's pretty much the consensus with anybody who actually spends time it. Code works some places and not others, all images have to be hosted somewhere else and they can change something on a moments notice screwing up some code that used to work. Basically when you open up your account everybody starts with the same page template then with graphics, html and style sheets you can make it pretty (ugly) anyway you want.

    I suggest doing the basics first on your music profile, upload your music, and add photos to your gallery, bio, tour dates and links back to your main website. Follow the KISS (keep it simple stupid) rule and once you got that then you can dink with the rest if you have the courage.

    This might sound like common sense things but often people don’t know these things. Next post I’ll explain some simple customization techniques for a good profile that doesn’t take 20 minutes to load.

    Previous Standing Out in a Crowd Posts:

    Technorati Tags: , , , ,

    Continue Reading...

  • To fully enjoy what podcasting is all about, you will need to download special software to Download Podcast Software

    Windows

    Mac

    " title="Podcasting Help & Tips" />

    Podcasting Help & Tips

    To fully enjoy what podcasting is all about, you will need to download special software to "tune in" to these podcasts. Links to software for various operating systems can be found below. After installation, come back here to NashvilleFeed.com for links to add our show.

    Download Podcast Software

    Windows

    Mac

    Continue Reading...

  • <h3>Effective Use of Your Marketing Time</h3>
<div style=
    The previous post I introduced the topic of how to stand out in a crowd when everybody is screaming. This could be promoting a show or yourself in general. I continue this time about effective use of your time. I think it’s about the long term goal of building your brand as an artist rather than selling out a show right away. Even though you’re promoting a show; it’s a much as marketing yourself as it is getting people to come out. I mentioned ROI or Return on Investment; are you wasting hours on putting flyers up on a pole that nobody reads. Personally I think putting flyers on street poles is a waste and adds to instead of cutting thru the clutter. (Course in conversation the other day I had someone disagree) What works and is effective.

    First what ever you estimate double it or triple it. I spent many hours on MySpace commenting profiles and emailing people about my live show. You could try some software online that allows you to post hundreds of comments at a time but it violates the terms of use. Is it worth risking getting your profile deleted for a quick fix? The promoters for Movement Nashville and Stalking the Muse must spend hundreds of hours for each show. (I could be wrong, if any of you guys are reading this feel free to comment.) But I do know a simple bulletin on MySpace isn’t enough. Promoting the show via your blog is a must; you should have one and be actively blogging. Next make sure you’re on any websites that have event listing. You should have a website, be up-to-date and not pointing to MySpace for everything. (it should be the opposite way, next blog topic) Partner with other artists and share the promotion work load. Ask your fans to pass the word on to others. Interact with them! I believe that word of mouth is the most effective form of marketing when you’re trying to build a brand. You still need talent though; all the marketing buzz in the world won’t help if you suck.

    I could continue on much longer but the main point is work smarter not harder if you can. Make note of what works and what doesn’t. Continue doing what worked, don’t what didn’t and keep trying something new. Do research and ask questions of your fans. Get your message out without annoying people.

    Next: Social Network Marketing

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    " title="Standing Out in a Crowd: Effective Use of Your Time" />
  • Standing Out in a Crowd: Effective Use of Your Time

    Posted on March 22, 2007 | No Comments

    Effective Use of Your Marketing Time

    The previous post I introduced the topic of how to stand out in a crowd when everybody is screaming. This could be promoting a show or yourself in general. I continue this time about effective use of your time. I think it’s about the long term goal of building your brand as an artist rather than selling out a show right away. Even though you’re promoting a show; it’s a much as marketing yourself as it is getting people to come out. I mentioned ROI or Return on Investment; are you wasting hours on putting flyers up on a pole that nobody reads. Personally I think putting flyers on street poles is a waste and adds to instead of cutting thru the clutter. (Course in conversation the other day I had someone disagree) What works and is effective.

    First what ever you estimate double it or triple it. I spent many hours on MySpace commenting profiles and emailing people about my live show. You could try some software online that allows you to post hundreds of comments at a time but it violates the terms of use. Is it worth risking getting your profile deleted for a quick fix? The promoters for Movement Nashville and Stalking the Muse must spend hundreds of hours for each show. (I could be wrong, if any of you guys are reading this feel free to comment.) But I do know a simple bulletin on MySpace isn’t enough. Promoting the show via your blog is a must; you should have one and be actively blogging. Next make sure you’re on any websites that have event listing. You should have a website, be up-to-date and not pointing to MySpace for everything. (it should be the opposite way, next blog topic) Partner with other artists and share the promotion work load. Ask your fans to pass the word on to others. Interact with them! I believe that word of mouth is the most effective form of marketing when you’re trying to build a brand. You still need talent though; all the marketing buzz in the world won’t help if you suck.

    I could continue on much longer but the main point is work smarter not harder if you can. Make note of what works and what doesn’t. Continue doing what worked, don’t what didn’t and keep trying something new. Do research and ask questions of your fans. Get your message out without annoying people.

    Next: Social Network Marketing

    Technorati Tags: , , ,

    Continue Reading...