Music Business Archive

  • This is the first of our panels covering tech news out of Nashville and tech that affects Nashville. Hosts: David Beronja, Dave Delaney, Lucas Hendrickson & Geoff Smith Subscribe with...

    Nashville Feed Episode 12 – Tech Episode 01 – SocialFresh, Griffin Tech at CES, Grand Ole Opry & Music Business Oh My

    This is the first of our panels covering tech news out of Nashville and tech that affects Nashville. Hosts: David Beronja, Dave Delaney, Lucas Hendrickson & Geoff Smith Subscribe with...

    Continue Reading...

  • In the early 2000s I subscribed to a monthly all you can stream music service by the name of MusicMatch. What sucked me in that the software was a good...

    Music Subscription Services Do They Work? For Me Yes, Until Yahoo! Killed It

    In the early 2000s I subscribed to a monthly all you can stream music service by the name of MusicMatch. What sucked me in that the software was a good...

    Continue Reading...

  • Word of warning to an Artist that wants to blow away their website and start new. You're inbound traffic will decline considerably. I know that every artist out there updates...

    Attention Artists: Changing Website Design & Structure Will Affect Your Inbound Traffic

    Word of warning to an Artist that wants to blow away their website and start new. You're inbound traffic will decline considerably. I know that every artist out there updates...

    Continue Reading...

  • <p><a href=SXSW 2010

    Steve Keller and Katy Kirby collaborated on two panel concepts for SXSW 2010.  They just found out  that both made it past the first round.  Community voting is a large part (although not the only part) of deciding the programming content of the festival.  They got together on this not for self-promotion, but because we believe that this festival/conference is important and that the terrific things going on in Nashville have been sorely underrepresented. 

    Please consider voting for these panel submissions and helping to spread the word in any way you can.  Feel free to forward this email along to any interested parties. (You do have to register to vote.) Voting closes at the end of the day on Friday, September 4th.

    Here they are:

    Music City 3.0:  How Technology is Reshaping Nashville
    If Music City 2.0 mirrors the current state of chaos in the industry, what lies ahead? Music City 3.0 seeks to answer that and more, drawing on the experience of a new generation of Music City digital activists who are reshaping Nashville as the epicenter of a music industry renaissance.

    Vote Here: http://panelpicker.sxsw.com/ideas/view/3671

    Music Business 3.0: You're the Boss
    If Music Business 2.0 mirrors the current state of chaos in the industry, what lies ahead? Music Business 3.0 seeks to answer that question and more, drawing on the experience of a new generation of Music City entrepreneurs who are reshaping Nashville as the epicenter of a music industry renaissance.

    Vote Here: http://panelpicker.sxsw.com/ideas/view/3673

    " title="Two Nashville SXSW Panel Pitches Made It Past The First Round! Help Them Make It All The Way!" />

    Two Nashville SXSW Panel Pitches Made It Past The First Round! Help Them Make It All The Way!

    SXSW 2010

    Steve Keller and Katy Kirby collaborated on two panel concepts for SXSW 2010.  They just found out  that both made it past the first round.  Community voting is a large part (although not the only part) of deciding the programming content of the festival.  They got together on this not for self-promotion, but because we believe that this festival/conference is important and that the terrific things going on in Nashville have been sorely underrepresented. 

    Please consider voting for these panel submissions and helping to spread the word in any way you can.  Feel free to forward this email along to any interested parties. (You do have to register to vote.) Voting closes at the end of the day on Friday, September 4th.

    Here they are:

    Music City 3.0:  How Technology is Reshaping Nashville
    If Music City 2.0 mirrors the current state of chaos in the industry, what lies ahead? Music City 3.0 seeks to answer that and more, drawing on the experience of a new generation of Music City digital activists who are reshaping Nashville as the epicenter of a music industry renaissance.

    Vote Here: http://panelpicker.sxsw.com/ideas/view/3671

    Music Business 3.0: You're the Boss
    If Music Business 2.0 mirrors the current state of chaos in the industry, what lies ahead? Music Business 3.0 seeks to answer that question and more, drawing on the experience of a new generation of Music City entrepreneurs who are reshaping Nashville as the epicenter of a music industry renaissance.

    Vote Here: http://panelpicker.sxsw.com/ideas/view/3673

    Continue Reading...

  • <p>iTunes gains their market share to 69% of all digital sales but the interesting thing is Amazon's MP3 store is gaining as well up to 7.6% from 5.1%. It doesn't seem like much but it is when you're going against an ecosystem which Apple has created where most consumers think you have to buy at their store. I have long ago switched to Amazon for my digital music, mainly because they didn't have DRM and higher quality MP3s while using a small program to inport my purchases into iTunes. I still use iTunes for the impulse video buys but that's because Amazon's videos won't work with the iPhone. Hopefully that will change.</p><h3>Further Reading:</h3><ul><li><a href=Apple’s iTunes Increases Its Lead In The Music Market
" title="iTunes Increases Digital Music Market Share But Consumers Open to Others" />

iTunes Increases Digital Music Market Share But Consumers Open to Others

iTunes gains their market share to 69% of all digital sales but the interesting thing is Amazon's MP3 store is gaining as well up to 7.6% from 5.1%. It doesn't seem like much but it is when you're going against an ecosystem which Apple has created where most consumers think you have to buy at their store. I have long ago switched to Amazon for my digital music, mainly because they didn't have DRM and higher quality MP3s while using a small program to inport my purchases into iTunes. I still use iTunes for the impulse video buys but that's because Amazon's videos won't work with the iPhone. Hopefully that will change.

Further Reading:

Continue Reading...

  • While this blog isn’t just about Country Music the fact is what happens in it affects us all in Music City for the good and the bad. Music Row has...

    Interesting Article on Country Music’s Shrinking Middle Class from Music Row

    While this blog isn’t just about Country Music the fact is what happens in it affects us all in Music City for the good and the bad. Music Row has...

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  • <p style=

    (This is the first in hopefully many wonder cross-post contributions from Me and the Machine Records. - mdave)

    by Josh Preston

    You just spent who knows how long writing, recording, mixing, mastering (and whatever else to your music) and you're ready to share it with the world! But before you do, think about this: If you were given the choice between a handwritten CD-R paper cover or a glossy full-color CD case, which would you prefer? Not that we think everything has to be shiny (though shiny things TOTALLY entertain us), but there is something to be said about packaging your music in a visually attractive way. Make it look as great as it sounds!

    We know. Just because you're an artist, that doesn't mean you're an "Artist". Below is MATM's Top 10 Tips for Album Art Creation and hopefully they'll make the whole process a little easier.

    1. When thinking about your album cover, consider what you want the cover to say about your music. Is there a mood you want to convey? Is there a pivotal moment that you would like to foreshadow on the cover? Your artwork is going to be the first thing most people are exposed to so be sure it says what you want it to say!
    2. Before you get too far in the creation of the album art, make sure you know how it needs to be formatted! If you are using a manufacturer like Discmakers or Oasis, they have templates available online to download so you can make sure the artwork is properly formatted for their print process. This is HUGELY important! Especially if you are paying someone to create the art... You don't want to have to pay them twice to reformat everything.
    3. Speaking of templates, when you're ready to download them, you'll probably find a few different file types. Maybe Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, and some others. Here are a couple of the differences in these design programs so you'll have some insight into the process. Adobe Photoshop has a great set of tools for manipulating photos. But Adobe Photoshop is pixel based, so if you are working with shapes and text, the larger you go, the more visible the pixels are and that can make the quality look a little less than stellar. Adobe Illustrator is not pixel based, but vector based. This means that you will not see the pixelation on the text and shapes when resizing them. Make sure you or whoever you choose to design the album art is familiar with both programs!
    4. The other thing you may notice when you are selecting a template is the never-ending styles of product choices you have! Jewel Cases, Sleeves, Eco-Walets, 4-panel, 6-panel, and on and on. This is really a personal preference and cost decision, but the one piece of advice we have is to always choose something with a spine! If you are sending your CD to press or radio, they will stick it on a shelf (if you're lucky...haha). When they stick it on a shelf, if your case does not have a spine, it will disappear in the midst of everything else to never be heard from again! Remember too, if you are manufacturing vinyl, you will need a separate template for that format.
    5. Pay attention to whether you need to use the CMYK or RGB formatting. CMYK is a four color print process (Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black) and RGB is a three color process (Red, Green and Blue). Most print is done in CMYK so it's probably a good idea to start there but double-check the formatting specs before you lay everything out.
    6. Keep the resolution high! If you are using Adobe Photoshop, make sure you are operating in at least 300 dpi (dots per inch) in order to keep your graphic quality solid.
    7. When designing the artwork, you will likely see red and green lines on your artwork template. These are the bleed and trim lines. Make sure your artwork fills that whole space out and overlaps the bleed and trim lines. This will ensure that if the printing is cut just slightly off in any direction that you will see art and not blank white space. The margin of error is small, usually an 1/8th of an inch, so it will not be noticeable even in the worst case scenario.
    8. Sweet! Your artwork is done... or is it? Did you include a space for the barcode? Most manufacturers will provide you with a barcode for a small fee (like $20 most times). Including a bar code is hugely important if you plan on selling your cds anywhere other than your live shows. If you plan on making your record available at your local record store, make sure you include a spot for the barcode on the back cover of your album! A good general rule is to leave .75" x 1.25" (and inserting a white block as a space holder might help).
    9. Save, save, save your work. We say this because we care. There is nothing worse than creating a graphic masterpiece only to have the power go out or a full-on computer crash and *POOF* there goes all the work you did. Trust us: Save your work often.
    10. Now that the artwork is done, take a look at it in another way. Can you use any part of the artwork as a graphic component for merchandise and/or does it tie-in with your website? Consistent imagery in a sea of over-saturation will go a long way to help your music stay on the minds of your new fans.

    We hope that these tips have been helpful! After all, our mission is only to make the world a little more beautiful, one album cover/website/t-shirt/sticker/etc. at a time! Also, don't forget to check out some of our designs at Me and the Machine Creative!

    Original for "MATM's Top 10 Tips for Album Art Creation" post is located at Me and the Machine Records Blog

    technorati tags:

    " title="Top 10 Tips: Album Packaging Creation" />

    Top 10 Tips: Album Packaging Creation

    (This is the first in hopefully many wonder cross-post contributions from Me and the Machine Records. - mdave)

    by Josh Preston

    You just spent who knows how long writing, recording, mixing, mastering (and whatever else to your music) and you're ready to share it with the world! But before you do, think about this: If you were given the choice between a handwritten CD-R paper cover or a glossy full-color CD case, which would you prefer? Not that we think everything has to be shiny (though shiny things TOTALLY entertain us), but there is something to be said about packaging your music in a visually attractive way. Make it look as great as it sounds!

    We know. Just because you're an artist, that doesn't mean you're an "Artist". Below is MATM's Top 10 Tips for Album Art Creation and hopefully they'll make the whole process a little easier.

    1. When thinking about your album cover, consider what you want the cover to say about your music. Is there a mood you want to convey? Is there a pivotal moment that you would like to foreshadow on the cover? Your artwork is going to be the first thing most people are exposed to so be sure it says what you want it to say!
    2. Before you get too far in the creation of the album art, make sure you know how it needs to be formatted! If you are using a manufacturer like Discmakers or Oasis, they have templates available online to download so you can make sure the artwork is properly formatted for their print process. This is HUGELY important! Especially if you are paying someone to create the art... You don't want to have to pay them twice to reformat everything.
    3. Speaking of templates, when you're ready to download them, you'll probably find a few different file types. Maybe Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, and some others. Here are a couple of the differences in these design programs so you'll have some insight into the process. Adobe Photoshop has a great set of tools for manipulating photos. But Adobe Photoshop is pixel based, so if you are working with shapes and text, the larger you go, the more visible the pixels are and that can make the quality look a little less than stellar. Adobe Illustrator is not pixel based, but vector based. This means that you will not see the pixelation on the text and shapes when resizing them. Make sure you or whoever you choose to design the album art is familiar with both programs!
    4. The other thing you may notice when you are selecting a template is the never-ending styles of product choices you have! Jewel Cases, Sleeves, Eco-Walets, 4-panel, 6-panel, and on and on. This is really a personal preference and cost decision, but the one piece of advice we have is to always choose something with a spine! If you are sending your CD to press or radio, they will stick it on a shelf (if you're lucky...haha). When they stick it on a shelf, if your case does not have a spine, it will disappear in the midst of everything else to never be heard from again! Remember too, if you are manufacturing vinyl, you will need a separate template for that format.
    5. Pay attention to whether you need to use the CMYK or RGB formatting. CMYK is a four color print process (Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black) and RGB is a three color process (Red, Green and Blue). Most print is done in CMYK so it's probably a good idea to start there but double-check the formatting specs before you lay everything out.
    6. Keep the resolution high! If you are using Adobe Photoshop, make sure you are operating in at least 300 dpi (dots per inch) in order to keep your graphic quality solid.
    7. When designing the artwork, you will likely see red and green lines on your artwork template. These are the bleed and trim lines. Make sure your artwork fills that whole space out and overlaps the bleed and trim lines. This will ensure that if the printing is cut just slightly off in any direction that you will see art and not blank white space. The margin of error is small, usually an 1/8th of an inch, so it will not be noticeable even in the worst case scenario.
    8. Sweet! Your artwork is done... or is it? Did you include a space for the barcode? Most manufacturers will provide you with a barcode for a small fee (like $20 most times). Including a bar code is hugely important if you plan on selling your cds anywhere other than your live shows. If you plan on making your record available at your local record store, make sure you include a spot for the barcode on the back cover of your album! A good general rule is to leave .75" x 1.25" (and inserting a white block as a space holder might help).
    9. Save, save, save your work. We say this because we care. There is nothing worse than creating a graphic masterpiece only to have the power go out or a full-on computer crash and *POOF* there goes all the work you did. Trust us: Save your work often.
    10. Now that the artwork is done, take a look at it in another way. Can you use any part of the artwork as a graphic component for merchandise and/or does it tie-in with your website? Consistent imagery in a sea of over-saturation will go a long way to help your music stay on the minds of your new fans.

    We hope that these tips have been helpful! After all, our mission is only to make the world a little more beautiful, one album cover/website/t-shirt/sticker/etc. at a time! Also, don't forget to check out some of our designs at Me and the Machine Creative!

    Original for "MATM's Top 10 Tips for Album Art Creation" post is located at Me and the Machine Records Blog

    technorati tags:

    Continue Reading...

  • <p><img width=Your Music Website is Important but Your Data is More Important. Getting your data out is very important don't get screwed like Echo people did.

    For years I'm been harping that an artist should have their own website because you own the content and data. Slowly but surly music artists have been moving their main web presence from MySpace or Facebook to their own domain aka website. Hosting and management tools are getting less expensive or even free so the shift has become less painful.

    An article (darknet: echo artist clients face imminent web shut-down) on String Theory Media last week touched another aspect of having your own website. It's the data and content you put on there.

    Echo Music emerged from the vast array of web design firms in Nashville becoming the dominate player building and hosting artist websites. They build their own system tailored specifically for the music artist for which they had some of the largest using including Dierks Bently, Rascal Flatts, Alicia Keys and more. So Echo eventually got bought for $25 million by Ticketmaster for which inside sources said they were going to leave it be on it's own. Yeah right....so earlier in 2009 the announcement came that Echo was moving to the west coast and most of the Nashville staff would be let go. The other shoe dropped mid-May when 200-300 smaller Echo artist clients would be dropped and their sites would go dark, the top 20-30 will still have a home on the Echo system. Here is the key item to the story, the Echo system is proprietary and there is no build function in their system to export the content. Meaning all the blogs, photos and other items that you uploaded to the Echo system cannot be moved to another website without some major work being done.

    So that's the back-story. Lot's of artists who spent lot's of time, resources and money got dumped because they didn't make enough money for Ticketmaster. All the wonderful things the Echo system did in one place had now has to be moved and reproduced elsewhere.

    So the lesson learned is that having a website is not enough anymore even if it does wonderful things all in one place, you need to make sure you can get your content aka stuff out. The internet moves at the speed of light where companies appear and disappear almost as fast. What would happen if Google decided to shut down YouTube tomorrow. Do you have copies of all the videos you have uploaded over the years? If not do you know how to get them out?

    If you are an dropped Echo artist looking for a new website don't just jump in with anybody who says they can get you up and running. You'll have a website again and probably spend a pile of money but is there a way you can get your information back out if something happens.

    Many agree Web 2.0 was the generation of Social Media, I believe that Web 3.0 will be the age of interchangeable data. You're website have have the pages people visit but all the content (pictures, video, blogs, etc.) will live on another computer where you can move to another company easily. Echo Music is a lesson in why you should care about Web 3.0 and interchangeable data.

    Further Reading:

    Technorati Tags: , , , ,

    " title="Web 3.0 the Age of Interchangeable Data and the Echo Music Demise Lesson" />

    Web 3.0 the Age of Interchangeable Data and the Echo Music Demise Lesson

    How Do I Get My Content Out?Your Music Website is Important but Your Data is More Important. Getting your data out is very important don't get screwed like Echo people did.

    For years I'm been harping that an artist should have their own website because you own the content and data. Slowly but surly music artists have been moving their main web presence from MySpace or Facebook to their own domain aka website. Hosting and management tools are getting less expensive or even free so the shift has become less painful.

    An article (darknet: echo artist clients face imminent web shut-down) on String Theory Media last week touched another aspect of having your own website. It's the data and content you put on there.

    Echo Music emerged from the vast array of web design firms in Nashville becoming the dominate player building and hosting artist websites. They build their own system tailored specifically for the music artist for which they had some of the largest using including Dierks Bently, Rascal Flatts, Alicia Keys and more. So Echo eventually got bought for $25 million by Ticketmaster for which inside sources said they were going to leave it be on it's own. Yeah right....so earlier in 2009 the announcement came that Echo was moving to the west coast and most of the Nashville staff would be let go. The other shoe dropped mid-May when 200-300 smaller Echo artist clients would be dropped and their sites would go dark, the top 20-30 will still have a home on the Echo system. Here is the key item to the story, the Echo system is proprietary and there is no build function in their system to export the content. Meaning all the blogs, photos and other items that you uploaded to the Echo system cannot be moved to another website without some major work being done.

    So that's the back-story. Lot's of artists who spent lot's of time, resources and money got dumped because they didn't make enough money for Ticketmaster. All the wonderful things the Echo system did in one place had now has to be moved and reproduced elsewhere.

    So the lesson learned is that having a website is not enough anymore even if it does wonderful things all in one place, you need to make sure you can get your content aka stuff out. The internet moves at the speed of light where companies appear and disappear almost as fast. What would happen if Google decided to shut down YouTube tomorrow. Do you have copies of all the videos you have uploaded over the years? If not do you know how to get them out?

    If you are an dropped Echo artist looking for a new website don't just jump in with anybody who says they can get you up and running. You'll have a website again and probably spend a pile of money but is there a way you can get your information back out if something happens.

    Many agree Web 2.0 was the generation of Social Media, I believe that Web 3.0 will be the age of interchangeable data. You're website have have the pages people visit but all the content (pictures, video, blogs, etc.) will live on another computer where you can move to another company easily. Echo Music is a lesson in why you should care about Web 3.0 and interchangeable data.

    Further Reading:

    Technorati Tags: , , , ,

    Continue Reading...